[a full-body design of Brambleberry sitting with herbs in her mouth]

Using Google Translate (Twice!) To Make Some Funny Warrior Names, Part Two by Reedpaw

Reedpaw puts more warrior names through Google Translate.

[a full-body design of Brambleberry sitting with herbs in her mouth]
Art by Warrior-Junkie
[a full-body design of Brambleberry sitting with herbs in her mouth]

Hello, hello, all of BlogClan, as I continue my reign as supreme Dorito (just kidding—sorta). Today, we will be looking at some unfortunate cats’ names that have gone through Google Translate twice, and see if they end up with the same general meaning. So let’s start! (Note: the language I’ll be using is Latin, because of its similarities with English.)

Mapleshade
Translation (Latin): Acer umbra (Fun fact: The Maple family’s scientific name is Acer!)
Translation (English): Sharp shade
Explanation: So, this is pretty simple. When you translate from English → Latin the word “sharp”, the first thing that pops up is “acuti”. However, there is also “acer”. And when you translate the word “maple”, it’s also “acer”. However, when you translate from Latin → English the word “acer”, the first word that comes up is “sharp”. Sooo, something got lost in translation, I guess.
(Note: I’ll be using only warrior names for more variation.)

Crookedjaw
Translation (Latin): Pravum maxilla
Translation (English): Bad cheek
Explanation: BAHAHAHAHHAHA *stops to catch breath* Okay, let’s see what went wrong. So basically, “crooked” from English → Latin is “pravum”, but “pravum” Latin → English is “wrong”. “Crooked” could mean “wrong”, I guess, and “wrong” could mean “bad”. So that explains the “Bad” part of it. Now for the “cheek” part. Okay, so apparently in Latin “jaw” and “cheek” both translate to “maxilla/maxillam”. Buuut “maxilla/maxillam” Latin → English both translate to “cheek”. Hence, Bad cheek.

Willowbreeze
Translation (Latin): Salices aurae
Translation (English): The willows of the wind
Explanation: Okay, sooo that’s actually pretty accurate. “Wind” and “breeze” are probably pretty easy to mix up, and the “the” part was added in because instead of “aura”, which means “wind” in Latin, Google Translate decided to make it “aurae”, which means “the wind”. So if they had left out the “e” in “aurae”, it would have been simply “Willow breeze”.

Brambleberry
Translation (Latin): dumus (Fun fact: The translation changes depending on if you enter “brambleberry” or “Brambleberry”. In this case, I chose the former because the translation is funnier.)
Translation (English): the guide
Explanation: Basically, when you translate from Latin → English the word “dumus”, the first translation is “the guide” —and the second is “bramble bush”. So, I guess Google Translate got confused…

So, let’s review the translations: Mapleshade → Sharp shade, Crookedjaw → Bad cheek, Willowbreeze → The willows of the wind, Brambleberry → the guide. For Part Three, I’ll be doing a BlogClan edition, so tell me if you want your name in my next article in the comments! Have a great day and please do not copy my idea because… you know… *whispers* No one likes a copycat! Oh, a pun, lol. Anyways, have a great day!

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